Michael Ernest Sweet

Photographer and Writer in New York, NY

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Michael Ernest Sweet is a listed Canadian photographer, writer, and an award-winning educator. He is the author of two street photography books, The Human Fragment and Michael Sweet's Coney Island, both from Brooklyn Arts Press.

Much of Michael's photography is centered around New York City and the beaches at Coney Island. He is known for photographing "fragments" of people, which are often very close and oddly composed. This signature look, combined with his unique subject matter, has made his photography instantly recognizable as his own.

Michael holds both a Canadian Prime Minister's Award and a Queen's Medal for exceptional public service to Canada. He has also been admitted to four university degrees including a graduate degree from The Johns Hopkins Univerity.

Michael's photography and writing has appeared widely in such publications as The Village Voice, Vice, HuffPost, Black and White Magazine, Popular Photography, Photo Life, Digital Camera, Hyperallergic, la Journal de la Photographie, Leica Camera, British Journal of Photography, and the legendary Evergreen Review, among others.

Michael currently works as a freelance photo writer for several print-based magazines including Canada's national photography magazine, Photo Life.

In 2019, Michael left street photography in order to begin studying painting under Pat Lipsky at the Art Students League of New York. Please note, prints of Michael's photography are no longer available for purchase.

Endorsements
Michael Sweet has transformed a place of the ordinary to that of the exceptional. His photographs express an inner reality that links one human to the other."
Roger Ballen
Michael, your photographs are such a strong synergy of great street photography work. You have brought together elements of Moriyama, Gilden/Sandler, Arbus, Mark Cohen, maybe a little Roger Ballen, and other greats too, to form this beautiful and distinctly original work."
LensCulture
Michael, I thought my colours were bright, but now I know I am quite muted!"
Martin Parr